Ramadan 2017

Eid-ul-Fitr Mubarak
Eid-ul-Fitr is on Sunday, June 25, 2017
Upcoming Event: Insha-Allah the Eid-ul-Fitr prayer will be held on Sunday June 25th, 7:00 am at Pocatello Mosque.
Eid-ul-Fitr Party will be held on Monday, June 26, 2017,
From 5:00pm to 9:00pm, PSUB Wood River Room.

For Ramadan 2017 Prayer Times Click Here

For Dua (Prayer) of Fasting Click Here

RAMADAN 2017 (Hijri Calender 1438)

What is Ramadan?

Ramadan (also known as Ramadhan or Ramzan) is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar. It is a period of prayer, fasting, charity-giving and self-accountability for Muslims in the United States. The first verses of the Koran (Qu’ran) were revealed to the Prophet Muhammad (also written as Mohammad or Muhammed) during the last third of Ramadan, making this an especially holy period.

Why Muslims Fast

Fasting in Ramadan is a main pillar of Islam that helps Muslim grow closer to the One God, Allah. According to the Qur’an “Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed to those before you, so that you may learn self-restraint” (sūrat l-baqarah (The Cow), Verse (2:183)). Fasting, which is recognized for its health, spiritual and psychological benefits, is considered by Muslims as a means to improve their moral characters and provides an opportunity for a spiritual renewal.

Purpose of Fasting

The real purpose of fasting is not to make us hungry and thirsty, or to deprive us some of our comfort and conveniences but to be conscious of Allah. It is to do one’s best to live by His commands and to avoid His prohibitions, fear of Allah, worship of Allah, sincerity in faith, and avoid the disobedience to Allah. Fasting is an invisible act. Only Allah and the person who is fasting know whether he or she is fasting or not. Fasting teaches how to control and discipline our desires. During fasting we learn how to say “no” to things that are otherwise permissible and good, but are forbidden during fasting. When one learns how to say “no” to that which is generally permissible, then one can easily control oneself to avoid that which is forbidden. Through fasting we taste—to some extent—the pain and suffering of those who are poor and destitute. Fasting teaches empathy and sympathy, and it takes away some of our selfishness and self-centeredness.

How Muslims Fast

Muslims fast from early dawn to sunset every day throughout the month. The fast requires Muslims to abstain from food, drink, marital relations and ill-conduct during the fast.

Who Fasts

Fasting in Ramadan is compulsory on all physically and mentally healthy and mature Muslims. Those exempted from fasting are the sick, old, pregnant and menstruating women and travellers. Pregnant and menstruating women and travellers make up the missed days by fasting at a later time.

Typical day during the Month

The day of fasting begins with an early morning meal before dawn and ends at sunset. The evening activities include the traditional breaking of the fast usually with dates and water, the sunset prayer followed by dinner (IFTAR). Muslims would then go to the mosque for congregational prayers in which at least one-thirtieth of the Qur’an is recited. The congregation would have listened to the recitation of the complete Qur’an by the end of the month. Ramadan is also a month for acts of charity. Some Islamic centers and organizations actively take part in charity events and activities such as giving basic necessities, including food and clothing, to the homeless or donating school equipment to schools.

End of Ramadan

Ramadan will conclude on June 25th/26th, 2017 depending on the sighting of the moon.

The celebration marking the end of Ramadan is called Eid-ul-Fitr, one of the major festivals in Islam and will be celebrated June 25th/26th, 2017 Insha’Allah, depending on the sighting of the moon.